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A BATHROOM
Close-Up

38 MILLION PEOPLE IN THE
U.S.WEAR CONTACT LENSES.1

More than 80 percent of them believe
they follow good lens care practices
while only
2 PERCENT ACTUALLY DO.2

WATER & LENSES
DON’T MIX

Whether tap
or distilled,
water contains microorganisms that can cause infections.

Do not rinse your lenses
or clean your case with water.

IF YOU SEE
RED, TAKE
A SECOND LOOK

Only about 4% of allergy sufferers have eye allergies as their primary allergy.3 If you see red eyes when you look into the mirror, remove
your lenses and consult your eye care professional.

WATCH
WHEN
YOU WASH

Some viruses and
bacteria can live up to
2 hours or more on surfaces such
as bathroom sinks.4 Always wash and dry hands before handling lenses for a successful lens wearing experience.

EYE ON THE
SOLUTION

Many people might
change their brand of floss
or mouthwash without a
second thought,
but make sure to speak to your eye care professional before changing contact lens solutions. Not all solutions are the same.

– GET READY FOR YOUR CLOSE-UP –

Remember to discard your mascara after three months of use.5

In addition, always apply makeup after inserting your contact
lenses and remove your lenses before removing makeup.6

EMPTY, RINSE & REPEAT

Clean, rinse, and air dry your lens case each time lenses are removed.

USE FRESH
NEW SOLUTION
EVERY TIME

About 90 percent of contact
lens wearers do not understand
the importance of disposing used contact lens solution before
adding fresh solution.2

– KEEP TALKING! –

Visit your eye care professional once a year
and talk about lens care.

References

1. Alcon data on file, 2013.

2. Robertson, DM, Cavanaugh HD. Non-compliance with contact lens wear and care practices: a comparative analysis. Optom Vis Sci 2011; 88:1402-8.

3. Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. Allergy Facts and Figures. http://www.aafa.org/display.cfm?id=9&sub=30
Accessed May 7, 2013.

4. South Dakota Department of Health. Stop it, Don’t Spread Germs. http://doh.sd.gov/Flu/PDF/FactSheet.pdf.
Accessed May 3, 2013.

5. US Food and Drug Administration. Eye Cosmetic Safety. http://www.fda.gov/Cosmetics/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/CosmeticsQA/ucm167467.htm. Accessed May 7, 2013.

6. American Optometric Association. Contact Lenses and Cosmetics. http://www.aoa.org/x5236.xml. Accessed May 7, 2013.